Individual Humor, by Marilyn Braendeholm

Individual Humor
by Marilyn Braendeholm

I heard your voice
deep in the swirl
of a nautilus shell,

heard you laughing
in a language I
didn’t understand,

as if humor
was breath and blood.
A priest’s liturgy.

I often wonder which words
leave you humorless.
Which mantra unwraps you
like God’s gift.

It should be a birthright,
humor, like ears. Toes.
Feet have such a sad
sense, don’t you think.

Note: Written in response to Red Wolf Prompt 412.

Marilyn (aka Misky) Braendeholm’s work is regularly published in monthly issues of Waterways Poetry in the Mainstream, and Ten Penny Players.

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Those Clouds, by Marilyn Braendeholm

Those Clouds
by Marilyn Braendeholm

As seen from
those folds and rolls

of clouds that skate
the sky, a slate puzzle

fitted and tucked,
jigged and jointed

like language strung
into long sentences,

into a bridge from
this horizon to where

I am your audience.

Note: Written in response to Red Wolf Prompt 409.

Marilyn (aka Misky) Braendeholm’s work is regularly published in monthly issues of Waterways Poetry in the Mainstream, and Ten Penny Players.

The Winnowed Approach, by Marilyn Braendeholm

The Winnowed Approach
by Marilyn Braendeholm

of tulips.
of daffodils.
they compete
with bare-knuckled weather.
they prepare
against the weight of snow,
against stem-breaking frost,
against long-tooth grey,
and still spring promises
on approach. comes,
day upon day,
and speaks to us
in four season languages,
wearing
its winnowed face.

Marilyn Braendeholm (‘Misky’) lives in the UK surrounded by flowers, grapevines, bubbling pots of sourdough starter, and people she loves. She never buys clothing without pockets. Her work is widely published. Between the Lines https://foundlines.wordpress.com

Those Grey Layers, by Marilyn Braendeholm

Those Grey Layers
by Marilyn Braendeholm

The thing about long-term memory, it feels like it just happened. Yesterday. Like when I remember my grandmother who passed-on more than 30-years ago. I can see her now. Grandma sitting in a straight-back wooden spindle chair. She sits where the sun breaks through the window but she still feels icy. And it’s just Grandma now; Grandpa’s recently dead. He went out fishing on the 3rd Tuesday of January last year. He threaded a nightcrawler on his hook, dropped the line over the side of the boat, and then had a heart attack. Out there alone on the lake. He floated around for 3-days in a January mist before anyone questioned why a row boat was out there. He froze board-stiff in that rowboat. Someone said he was the coldest shade of grey they’d ever seen. Greyer than winter, the policeman said. Winter’s a widow-maker, Grandma claimed. She looks out the window, sips her Earl Grey tea, and asks for another lap blanket. Her voice is shallow as lapping water. She’s not long for the next world. Asleep or awake, sometimes we can’t tell which when she closes her eyes. Those soft eyelids that disregard the lines between day and night. Sometimes she pretends to be deaf. I suspect that she hears everything that she can’t see. But as I said, it all seems like yesterday. Plus and or minus those intervening years.

like old grey stone,
that blue-eyed cat on her lap,
alas, there she ends

Marilyn Braendeholm, aka ‘Misky, lives in England surrounded by flowers in the summer, jars of sourdough starter in the winter, and old pots and pans when she’s testing recipes in the kitchen. Her poetry is regularly published by the literary magazine, Waterways: Poetry in the Mainstream.

Summer Blue, by Marilyn Braendeholm

Summer Blue
by Marilyn Braendeholm

The garden gate is slamming —
the wind’s picked up, and August
is disappearing into drizzle;
sets petunias on their weary way.

A march toward mould and mess.
Odd how a slick of rain melts
purple blossoms into streaks
that stick to your fingers and

stain you like a typesetter
in a print shop — summer stains,
permanently blue. Blue, yes,
it’s the end of summer blue.

Note: Written in response to Red Wolf Poems, Prompt 320.

Marilyn Braendeholm, aka ‘Misky, lives in England surrounded by flowers in the summer, jars of sourdough starter in the winter, and old pots and pans when she’s testing recipes in the kitchen. Her poetry is regularly published by the literary magazine, Waterways: Poetry in the Mainstream.

A Voice Within, by Marilyn Braendeholm

A Voice Within
by Marilyn Braendeholm

And there’s the sun. Climbing
the horizon. Drifting. Light
strung through trees. It sings
with a foggy voice, joining
impatient birds. And, I see

the birdbath needs refilling;
blackbirds drum their wings,
spilling water from their
tasselled tails. And, there
in the corner by the fence,

the roses are full heads
of bloom. I’ll cut a pillar
of fired-orange, a bouquet
for the table. A displayed
feast for lunch. And after,

I’ll re-oil the cutting board –
the teak one. I love it, and
my affection for it’s showing.
It’s old. Honourable. Sturdy.
Worn. Like my sensible shoes.

So I take on tasks by minutes.
Each day an epithet at sunset.

Marilyn ‘Misky’ Braendeholm lives in the UK surrounded by flowers, grapevines, and the rolling hills of West Sussex. She never buys clothing without pockets. Her work is widely published.

The Last Move, by Marilyn Braendeholm

The Last Move
by Marilyn Braendeholm

My mother had a weightless ease about her;
        my father well grounded.

He was wordlessly quiet, a revolution
        of important thoughts.

Strategy being his favourite, chess
        by choice, and he always won.

Mom said games were for bullies –
        I never understood until Dad lost.

He lost his quiet to an unshaven man
        with a hole in his shoe.

Dad never played chess again, but Mom
        remained weightless as any breeze.

 

Marilyn (Misky) Braendeholm lives in the UK surrounded by flowers, grapevines, bubbling pots of sourdough starter, and always keeps dog biscuits in her pocket for her blind Springer Spaniel. She never buys clothing without pockets. Her work is widely published.

The Practical Freedom of Madness, by Marilyn Braendeholm

The Practical Freedom of Madness
by Marilyn Braendeholm

dream-2011 Jacek Yerka (1)

Art by Jacek Yerka

I remember the day that I woke,
mad — and I thought I’d
crackle from the heat of it all.
It felt like every mask I’d worn,
was removed. Like sandpaper,
I was an irritant in my own skin.
And I remember layers of myself,
dissolved — such a practical way
of dressing,
and undressing,
and sometimes I fancy myself
a surreal piece of art, like a cat
who’s stealing my seven lives.

Process notes: This was prompted by an image, Prompt 46 (via Magpie Tales), Red Wolf Poems, and it occurred to me that as we sleep — we all go slightly mad.

Marilyn ‘Misky’ Braendeholm lives in the UK surrounded by flowers, grapevines, and always keeps dog biscuits in her pocket for her blind, aging Springer Spaniel. She never buys clothing without pockets. Her work is published by Waterways Journal, Poetry Quarterly, Curio Poetry, Gnarled Oak, and several print anthologies. She blogs at The Chalk Hills Journal.

A Tangle of Sleeping Beauties, by Marilyn Braendeholm

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Jan Davidsz de Heem, Still Life with Oysters and Lemon

A Tangle of Sleeping Beauties
by Marilyn Braendeholm

There on the table is a tangle of fruit,
a jeweller’s asset of sleeping beauties.
They lay broad across cottons and fine
wool, set right toward void, as a crow flies.

It’s a world wrapped up in itself, moonish
grapes and bracelets of peel, sweet citrus
circling the sun – such a deadened world
it must be, all for want of air to breathe.

And framed of gilt they watch but never
hear a rush of larger worlds nearby. Nor
even slightest hope have they for a knight
to wake them from their deeply tangled sleep.

Process note: Inspired by an image prompt at Red Wolf Poems, also the cover art for Red Wolf Journal’s Fall 2015 Issue 7.

Marilyn ‘Misky’ Braendeholm lives in the UK surrounded by flowers, grapevines, bubbling pots of sourdough starter, and always keeps dog biscuits in her pocket for her blind Springer Spaniel. She never buys clothing without pockets. Blogs at The Chalk Hills Journal.

The Courage of Shadows, by Marilyn Braendeholm

The Courage of Shadows
by Marilyn Braendeholm

We shadowed clouds
like passing thunder,
and tucked ourselves
under its darkest rim.
Once so bright,
we’re now swept
so dim, departed
with the glow of day.

That light that comes
from the breaking sea,
that light that comes
from long hills grassy,
pouring down from sky.
And then you asked me,

the wind stealing words
from our lips, How can
deserts change to lakes
and mountains
pour with rain, and
are our noble-hearted
shadows brave enough
to always follow us?

Process note: Exploring shadows based on the changeable nature of light. Inspired by Victor Hugo, “Les Orientales” and an image prompt, Persephone, at Red Wolf Poems.

Marilyn ‘Misky’ Braendeholm lives in the UK surrounded by flowers, grapevines, bubbling pots of sourdough starter, and always keeps dog biscuits in her pocket for her blind Springer Spaniel. She never buys clothing without pockets. Blogs at The Chalk Hills Journal.