Release of Fall/Winter 2017/2018 Issue 12: Memento Mori

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We are pleased to announce the release of the Fall/Winter 2017/2018 Issue.

The poets with work in this edition are:

John Aylesworth
Gershon Ben-Avraham
Wendy Bourke
Marilyn Braendeholm
Dah
Tony Daly
Holly Day
Milton P. Ehrlich
Joseph M. Felser
Jared M. Gadsby
Howie Good
Mitchell Krockmalnik Grabois
Miriam Green
Christopher Hileman
Diane Jackman
Laurinda Lind
Arthur Lamar Mitchell
Felicia Mitchell
Keith Moul
Sergio A. Ortiz
Jared Pearce
Roslyn Ross
Margarita Serafimova
Debi Swim
Alan Toltzis
Candelin Wahl
Martin Willitts Jr
Alan Walowitz
Barbara Young
Janet Youngdahl

You may download a copy of the PDF release here.

Red Wolf Journal fall winter 2017 2018 Issue 12

 

We welcome your submission of new poems to our Spring/Summer 2018 issue, on the theme of “Coming Home”.

With pleasure,
Irene Toh & Tawnya Smith
Fall/Winter 2017/2018 Editors

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Imprinting Waves, by Jesse LoVasco

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Reading Jesse LoVasco’s collection is like having a sojourn in nature, for it is from nature that her poems get their inspiration. The poems embody the journey of a feminine self in communion with nature’s wilderness, its elements of earth, wind, fire and water (snow and ice), its fruit (corn, peas, pickled beets, beans), its spirit animals (horse, rabbit, fawns, coyote, owl, wolves, bear, moose). The rich amalgam of images calls the self to unmistakably return to sacred nature.

The poems also touch on the themes of ancestry, sisterhood and human aging. The song of the poet calls out to those who have gone on before her.

I will
lay down a carpet of leaves,
make my home in a grove of trees
and sing out from my heart in sacred notes, until they recognize me.
(“Authentic Reintegration of the Wild and Sacred”)

It ascribes the journey of the poetic self who writes these things down, “galloping/
over the inner worlds” (“Horse”), an image that is reinforced elsewhere in the collection:

saddling the horse
of my legs
up steep mountains,
feeling wind blow
the mane of my hair
(“West”)

Often the images hold the reader enthralled, like this one:

The farm woman yields to passing time,
sighs on the chair by the stairs,
her work complete.
(“Corn Maidens”)

A few poems, such as “Murmuration” or “Snow Ghosts”, take on a concrete shape following the birds’ trajectory or simulating a whirlpool.

Jesse’s poems affirm the sacredness of life in its varied forms, all within a natural universe that is home and serves as the end point of the human journey.

Her poetic journey dovetails nicely with the theme of our forthcoming Spring/Summer 2018—“Coming Home”. Watch this space!

Download the collection here.

Imprinting Waves by Jesse LoVasco (1)

Say This In A Whisper, by Dah

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Dah’s poetry collection, Say This In A Whisper, should perhaps come with an advisory: there are sexually charged poems such as “How To Love A Lover”, “Summer, Ocean”, “Pulsar” and “Underwater, Still Breathing”.

Their nexus is the relationship between lovers which leaves you in no doubt about where the potency lies. “Summer, Ocean” carves out physical intensity in an almost predictable way yet doesn’t strike you as being facile:

“You, the matador
drinking the bull’s blood
Me, the bull goring you into ecstasy
until we lay finished off
our bodies trembling
smelling of ocean summers”

The collection’s first poem, “Oceans Of Rain”, sets a kind of framework by disavowing religion. The speaker is “an old inmate” with the gravitas of age:

“Now, I’ve seasoned
to this gray winter
an old inmate
waiting for light
to reap darkness
waiting for darkness
to bear down

Dah writes with disarming physical candor in his love poems. There is so much light and shadow in them, that it’s most certainly spiritual while being physical. But after the ecstasy comes the agony. The lover’s absence leaves the speaker emotionally stranded. The poems segue to a requiem. Every poem shines a different light on the grieving process of remembering. There is savagery in “you were the feathers/plucked from my mouth” (“A Missing Story”) to distraction where “we drink wine each night/to reach that neon glow/in the dark of a cloistered room” (“Pictures of You”).

Sure, there’s pathos there, but someone has said, if you haven’t loved deeply enough, haven’t had that kind of physical experience, you don’t know anything much. Such pathos may be another path to transcendence, if not through religion. Why, to speak of eternity as “a strange fracture/always breaking/before one reaches the line/the mood variations, another farewell” in “Another Picture of You” to the discernment of trees in “Pulsar”:

“I look through the grille
of bare trees
through the mineshafts
of shadows”

A tender, riveting read for all lovers!

Download the collection here.

Say This In A Whisper by Dah

New Site!
Red Wolf Journal’s digital collections has a dedicated new site
at Red Wolf Editions here.

Green-Weak Poems by Therese Broderick–A New Poetry Release

Red Wolf Editions is pleased to announce the release of a new poetry collection by Therese Broderick.

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A daughter’s labor in grass-cutting epitomizes these elegiac familial poems. The three sections of this endearing collection act together as memory and catharsis, with an overall tone of love and whimsy. The first “green-weak” section opens with the remembrance. It defines the father-daughter relationship, its roots in the practice of scissoring the cardboard found within her father’s Roxy shirts into a child’s hand-made cards.

The poems take us through art and illness, a mother’s sense of lack, a brother’s divorce and other undoings. At heart the poems honor the perfection of imperfections: “And I loved him/to the end/despite a lifelong lack/of luster.” (Song for the Colorblind Artist). The collection’s title refers to her father’s congenital “green-weak” colorblindness, a faulty perception of reds and greens.

Her idyllic musings while cutting grass by scissors is at center, a meditation (glimpsing “the conjuring garden knot, its green snaking”) serving as transition to the third “regreening” section. It deals with death and loss. It is grief contained by noticing “an opened bag of nougat and milk/chocolate truffles” at her mother’s cremation and tellingly endured through the arrayed riches of Morocco. The reader takes each mouthful of poems, cupping them, full of weight and weightlessness.

Then there’s the one and only erotic poem, which is clinically breathtaking, a kind of Spanish blessing.

Green is the trope, whether in the Moroccan silk of “Paradise Green”, or in grass’s “emerald blade”, or “the neon L sprouting from Google’s trademark.” How deep sorrow, how deep the green. It becomes blue.

Download the collection here.

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